DD-WRT in Repeater Bridge mode

ddwrt

DD-WRT is a third party developed firmware, released under the terms of the GPL for many ieee802.11a/b/g/h/n wireless routers based on a Broadcom or Atheros chip reference design. — DD-WRT wiki

Today we are discussing DD-WRT and specifically how you can do some cool stuff that you would not be able to do with your current wireless router. Chances are that your home router is compatible with DD-WRT. You can find this out by checking the DD-WRT router database. With DD-WRT firmware loaded, your router is able to do some tricks it might not be able to do before. One of these things might involve the repeater bridge mode, which can improve your WiFi range at home. Since devices are automatically switching between WiFi and 3G, especially since the 3G prices (in the Netherlands) are quite high and/or low data traffic limits apply, this mode is a necessity.

So what is the plan? Let’s assume you have a living room with an (non wireless) Internet modem, a server, a printer and a laptop. In your study you have another three PC’s. You need a Mac, a Windows PC and a Linux computer right? Occasionally you bring your laptop from the living room. Let’s assume your wife (or husband) did not allow you to put a nice fast gigabit cable connection between your living room and the study, because he/she feels the cables do not match the interior design. Obviously there is no arguing and you need to go wireless. The fastest wireless connections you get now follow the N standard with a theoretical maximum of 300 Mbps. In reality you will probably only get a fraction of that, because of the distance you need to cover. In my house I get about 25 Mbit with going one floor up and passing a bathroom. But anyway, this would be the network layout you can build using DD-WRT on you router:

Repeater_Bridge

The funny poles are actually DD-WRT routers and one is configured as the primary. If your modem has wireless and a switch you can just leave that primary router out, since it is just configured as a standard access point. The secondary is actually a DD-WRT router in repeater bridge mode. This means it connects to the access point by wireless and then announces it’s own SSID (e.g. “wifi-study”) whereas the primary announces the “wifi-living”. Now you can use your laptop in the study as well, and connect the PC’s to the router through wired connections. Note that you can replace the antenna with a Yagi antenna and boost the transmission power to get a better reach and a higher wireless speed.

If you run the router in repeater bridge mode, there are a few settings you need to make sure you set correctly:

  1. You must set your encryption to “WPA2 personal” with “AES” encryption.
  2. You must set your wireless channel to a fixed one, so do NOT put it on “auto”.
  3. Please make sure you follow the instructions carefully.

If you do not yet own a DD-WRT capable router you might consider getting one of these new, very fast routers:

  • Netgear WNDR4300
  • Asus RT-AC66U
  • TP-Link TL-WDR4300
  • Cisco Linksys E4200

These very fast routers have awesome specifications and can run DD-WRT perfectly. I have the older, slower Cisco Linksys E2500 and even older and slower Cisco Linksys WRT54GL routers myself, but they also run DD-WRT fine.

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